What is the link between the False Claims Act and whistleblowers?

For obvious and myriad reasons, the federal government pays close attention to business activities in Texas and across the country.

After all, the United States is the world’s foremost capitalist nation, with a history centrally underscored by a belief in free enterprise and business development.

As such, reams of business-related laws and rules exist to oversee and regulate commercial activity at both the state level and nationally.

Tax implications abound in the commercial sphere. Environmental considerations loom large, as do matters focused upon antitrust concerns and intellectual property.

And fraud. The federal government has long been concerned with fraudulent business activities, especially those essentially deemed as stealing from the general public.

One statutory vehicle that centrally addresses fraud is the False Claims Act, which our website at the Houston white collar criminal defense law firm of Hilder & Associates, P.C., notes “allows lawsuits known as ‘qui tam’ suits against individuals and corporations that have defrauded the federal government.”

One of our central practice areas is the proven and long-tenured representation of so-called “whistleblowers” who have inside knowledge concerning material business fraud and seek to act on behalf of the government by revealing fraudulent activities through qui tam suits.

Such persons, sometimes termed relators, may have evidence that ultimately persuades the government to intervene in litigation.

Whistleblower suits are often complex and sensitive matters involving many issues, including relevant timing constraints regarding filing and rules governing rewards for spotlighting fraud.

For those and additional reasons, an individual with knowledge of business fraud and a desire to do something about it might reasonably want to contact an experienced False Claims Act attorney without delay for advice and diligent representation concerning the filing of a qui tam whistleblower lawsuit.

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